The Danger of the Monster Myth

Eighteen months ago Tom Meagher’s wife, Jill, was raped and murdered on her way home in Melbourne. This week Tom wrote this incredible piece about men’s violence against women. Please read and share.

4:58

martha-ellen:

At our old house in Richmond - 1996

My sister Martha (left), my brother Joey (middle), and me.

martha-ellen:

At our old house in Richmond - 1996

My sister Martha (left), my brother Joey (middle), and me.

11:01    source   reblog

martha-ellen:

At a rally (I’m on the left. Freda’s on the right)

martha-ellen:

At a rally (I’m on the left. Freda’s on the right)

11:00    source   reblog

Anonymous: Do you believe that some women just don't WANT to stay home with their kids or even want kids at all? I agree with most of what you say but sometimes it seems like you advocate a one size fits all approach to feminism and I don't think that's realistic or beneficial. I'm sorry if this sound rude or like an attack, I'm just genuinely interested in your opinion on this and I'd like to hear your thoughts.

Yeah, of course, and it’s not a belief, I know some women don’t want kids. How would all mothers “staying at home” with their children be a realistic expectation anyway? The privilege of being able to leave the workforce to be the primary carer of your child is usually only a choice middle class women with well-paid partners can make. I do think that’s unfair, and I support an allowance for mothers so that such a privilege could be enjoyed by mothers regardless of class if they didn’t want to work outside the home while they were, say, breastfeeding. But that wouldn’t fit in too well with neoliberal demands for an ever-expanding GDP (ever wondered why paid parental leave advocacy by politicians is almost always framed in economically advantageous terms?). 

8:09

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Anonymous: Have you read any of Wendell Berry's work? He has some pretty cool feminist thoughts and talks about the importance of intimate sexual relationships and i i think you'd find him interesting. Not to mention the major environmental/agrarian themes that he writes about. He is a tad conservative for me, but has brilliant thoughts nonetheless.

I like many of his ideas. As someone who is sceptical of the liberal feminist aim of imitating men in a wage economy, and who prefers to imagine a culture profoundly shaped by the true liberation of women, I find quotes like this to be a breath of fresh air…

"Under the sponsorship of "conservative" presidencies, the economy of the modern household, which once required the father to work away from home — a development that was bad enough — now requires the mother to work away from home, as well. And this development has the wholehearted endorsement of "liberals," who see the mother thus forced to spend her days away from her home and children as "liberated" — though nobody has yet seen the fathers thus forced away as "liberated." Some feminists are thus in the curious position of opposing the mistreatment of women and yet advocating their participation in an economy in which everything is mistreated."

7:57

Decolonizing women’s history

I must listen to at least 30 hours of political podcasts per week, and here’s a good one I heard this morning on the way to work. Historian Max Dashu discusses how patriarchal academic institutions have traditionally suppressed or misrepresented women’s history and trivialised significant and influential female leaders of the past.

7:20

Today is Jon’s birthday and I’m feeling more sentimental than usual.  I guess because the last two years with this man have been completely different to all the years that came before. He is my true equal and has filled in all the emotional blank spaces I had in my life. Such a stunning person.

Today is Jon’s birthday and I’m feeling more sentimental than usual.  I guess because the last two years with this man have been completely different to all the years that came before. He is my true equal and has filled in all the emotional blank spaces I had in my life. Such a stunning person.

11:25  reblog

(via remember-well)

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9:46    source   reblog

Depression is a disease of civilization.

9:34

(via silver-bee)

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9:31    source   reblog

Tumblr sabbatical while I tackle an insanely busy few months. In the meantime, enjoy this:

3:29

aesthetic-nirvana: I know this is a question that could be taken the wrong way depending on your perception of the word, but do you think you were always intelligent? Or was intelligence something you taught yourself. Honestly, I'm sure you always had the capacity, but maybe just not the focus. How did you teach yourself to stay so focused? As you said, you went from failing high school, to working on your PhD. That's very inspirational.

Intelligence and academic success are only loosely interlaced. I’m not very intelligent. I’ve never had a very good memory, I’m easily distracted, and it can take me a while to clarify an idea in my mind before I feel confident enough to express it verbally. But I try to supplant my shortcomings by being extremely stubborn with my work! I stick to it even when it feels excruciatingly difficult. Naturally intelligent people like to brag about completing A+ work in a ridiculously short amount of time, well, that’s not me. I take a long time and I agonise over my work. I realised intelligence was perhaps not the most crucial thing after witnessing a former friend with the IQ of a genius drop out of a Bachelor’s degree because it was too overwhelming. It’s just as important to be determined, organised, informed of what’s required of you, willing to take risks, realistic about the pain involved in achieving success, and committed to producing something you can be proud of.

8:12